I am not naturally positive. Reading from Zig Ziglar and John Maxwell has been helpful. Zig Ziglar says, “Positive thinking will let you do everything better than negative thinking will.” John Maxwell illustrates: “Planes have an attitude indicator at the center instrument panel. The attitude is the position of the aircraft in relation to the horizon. A nose high attitude has the nose of the plane pointed above the horizon. The attitude determines a plane’s performance. Speed increases in a nose-high position. People need nose-high attitudes rather nose-down attitudes.” (The Winning Attitude, pp. 3-4) Get your nose in the air!

I value learning, but I have not always learned wisely. Learn for the purpose of using it in practical experience for some practical good. John Maxwell says we should learn every day and learn to earn—learn to gain something. Learn from taking big risks and jumping into new experiences instead of just from reading. Timing is also important in learning. We often take breaks from learning at the wrong times. Mark Cole warns that learning often decreases as winning increases. T. H. White wrote, “The best thing for being sad is to learn something.” Learn wisely.

When Abraham was about 110 years old, God gave him the greatest test of his life in Genesis 22. Don’t we ever get to retire from spiritual tests? Answer: Not until death. Some of the greatest spiritual tests will come in old age—sometimes associated with old age! God tells Israel in Isaiah 48:10 that He has refined and tested them in the furnace of affliction—for God’s glory. We may get to retire from a career, but we don’t get to retire from spiritual tests. Recognizing this is the first step to glorifying God in spiritual tests.

When Abraham was about 110 years old, God gave him the greatest test of his life in Genesis 22. Don’t we ever get to retire from spiritual tests? Answer: Not until death. Some of the greatest spiritual tests will come in old age—sometimes associated with old age! God tells Israel in Isaiah 48:10 that He has refined and tested them in the furnace of affliction—for God’s glory. We may get to retire from a career, but we don’t get to retire from spiritual tests. Recognizing this is the first step to glorifying God in spiritual tests.

We can get along without prayer, says Oswald Chambers (My Utmost for His Highest, August 28), because prayer doesn’t nourish our lives so much as it nourishes the life of Jesus inside us. This is probably why for so much of my life I have really struggled with praying. I have been interested in nourishing my life—doing anything that makes my life better. Prayer doesn’t always do that. I am learning to be more interested in nourishing God’s life within me. The best thing in my life is God. That is what I should nourish!

Oswald Chambers pointed out something in Matthew 6:6 to which I had paid no attention. I had focused on “praying in secret,” but the Biblical emphasis is on “praying to your Father who is in secret place.” God knows what is really in the most secret and deepest parts of my heart and soul. It is from there He wants me to pray. Getting in my room and closing the door only helps me shut out the noise around me to find the things in my life that really matter so that I can pray real prayers.

Job has a nugget of gold for us tucked away in Job 12:11. He says the ear tests words as the tongue or palate tastes food. Last week I was on my annual road trip with friends to the Global Leadership Summit in Chicago. We enjoy great food and engaging conversations on the trip. We wouldn’t return to place where the food disappointed us. As hosts, we want the food we serve to taste good. Yet we often don’t put as much thought into the words we serve other people. Will my words sound good in their ears?